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Blending the Past with Contemporary

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF CARTHAGE

#competition, #architecture, #re-use, #urbanplanning, #museumdesign, #historiczone, #romanempire

Information

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF CARTHAGE

Medioterra – terram in medio | la tierra en medio | la terre au milieu


A land in the middle.

Carthage, a Mediterranean west African city (A Maghrebian Metropolis) that has existed across a wide spectrum of history.


The layers of the earth and what they contain are very rich. The same mythical plants can be found on the opposite side of the sea also thrives here, eucalyptus and pine trees...


The same myths and legends that can be found on the opposite side of the sea are also present here.


The stories of two princesses, Helen from Troy and Elyssa-Didion from Tyre, one fell in love with a brother and the other one ran away from her brother, show the strong connections between the people and stories of the Mediterranean.


Here before us lies the generosity of the Mediterranean, in tales of love and adventure, woven into the very fabric of its culture and history.


On the other hand, there is the unique mysticism and skills of the Northwest African geography. A culture that knows how to use the harsh sun and shadow well, doesn't hesitate to bring the clean Mediterranean air into their courtyards and houses. And the building habits of this culture that skillfully uses clay and brick.

Client

Republique Tunisienne Ministere des Affaires Culturelles

Location

Carthage, Tunisia

Size

17.500 sqm

Program

Urban Design, Museum & Library, Cultural Complex, Ancient Landscape

Status

International Competition

Collaborators

Lebriz ATAN KARAATLI

Sacit Arda KARAATLI

Şule KARABIYIKOĞLU

Yunus ATILGAN


M. Cemil AKTAŞ (caps.office)

Pınar KESİM AKTAŞ (caps.office)


IVABOX

States of Carthage by caps.office

THE ORGANIZATION OF FLOWS TOWARDS THE ACROPOLE


By reconfiguring Byrsa Hill's square layout, visitors can access the acropolis through a pedestrian axis representing the city's historical layers as a timeline. This panoramic view offers a preliminary grasp of the city's history before touring the museum.


The museum experience is enhanced with modern museology. Afterward, visitors return to the eastern square. The flow design allows continuous acropolis views, mirroring historical perspectives from the city. Internal routes cover Roman and Punic Necropolis sites, concluding at the church square for a comprehensive experience.


Lighting distinguishes the Roman forum boundaries for better visibility. The setup aligns with historical views, offering insight into evolving urban landscapes. This approach deepens visitors' understanding of the area's cultural and historical significance across time.

KAAT ARCHITECTURE + URBAN

Caferağa Mahallesi 34347  

Moda - Kadıköy   | |   İSTANBUL 

T   :   +90 216 330 55 84

F   :   +90 216 330 55 84

In the heart of Carthage, a unique architectural concept emerges at the crossroads of two rich cultural heritages, where the Roman Empire's gridal urban system encounters the Maghrebi Acropolis. This urban area, defined by two pivotal axes, Decumanus Maximus and Cardo Maximus, centers around Byrsa Hill. The architectural vision comprises two key components: the preservation and rejuvenation of historical structures and the creation of a contemporary extension building.


Historical buildings within the precinct have been meticulously safeguarded to retain their cultural significance. Notably, the Seminary of the White Fathers building, serving as a museum since 1875, is proposed for reinforcement and adaptation to house both permanent and temporary exhibitions, along with administrative units. Other architectural adjustments, like removing the mezzanine floor and creating strategic openings, enhance the structure's function. Meanwhile, the Cathedral maintains its role as a place of worship and visitor attraction.


The design of the new extension building exemplifies a harmonious fusion of modern aesthetics with traditional construction methods. Striking a balance between history and contemporary narrative, this approach seeks to amplify the area's historical significance while seamlessly integrating the new structure. It reinstates symmetry, complements existing architecture with rhythmic arches, and provides a penetrable ground level, fostering a connection between visitors, the courtyard, and the archaeological site. Notably, the use of eucalyptus-lined alleys creates a unique ambiance, enhancing the overall visitor experience. This architectural concept revives Carthage's past while paving the way for a vibrant future, where history and modernity coexist in harmony.

Crafting with Tradition: Baked Brick Craftsmanship in the Maghreb